Design & Food: Our trip to Copenhagen part III (ii)

Late afternoon-ish we went back out for the next part of the journey, we were getting the train to Malmö to meet Tom’s childhood friend and his wife.

Buying a ticket to Malmö is fuss free and costs around twenty quid return.  We got on the very clean train (cleaner than anything back in the UK) and sat opposite each other looking at the window. Both of us humming the tune of Hollow Talk by Choir of Young Believers, the theme of the Scandi noir drama The Bridge/Broen/Bron with a smirk on our faces. The train itself doesn’t take long to get to the other side. The scenery of the sound was great don’t get me wrong, but I assume you can appreciate the spectacle a bit more if you cross with a car.

In a blink and we were at Malmö Central Station. When we stepped off the train there was a bit of a police or polis presence and, being the nerds that we are, were half expecting Saga Norén to be around the corner! We walked through the city, passing the Elite Hotel Savoy Malmö, a grand and exquisite 19th century building, you could imagine being in a Wes Anderson film.

First on the list was to change some money into Swedish Krona, which was quite easy as there was a Bureau de Change  around the corner. Expecting to change some of the Danish currency, weirdly it was a better deal changing from our GBP, so we did just that. Now we were ready to explore this amazing city.

We continued to the main square onto the stylish Södergatan where the streets are lined with chic shops and cafés. Shopping in Malmö has some of the familiarities of nearby Copenhagen, like Tiger (although over here its named TGR) but Malmö has its own range of Swedish shops that are simple and stylish and filled with things (sadly for me 😉 ) that are appealing to bring back home. Bolia for instance, is full of affordable Scandinavian design. Just walking into my favourite shop Granit is like a monochrome explosion. Everything in glass, concrete and black & white. I just had to stock up on glass bottles, in medicine bottle brown – mimicking ridiculously pricey Aesop products. To the left of Granit is Lagerhaus, like Granit- only cheaper. YAY!

Unlike Copenhagen, Malmö also has a Marimekko store and a MUJI – one of my favourite stores back home – well, when I visit London. We strolled onto Skomakaregatan in the Old Town, filled with small boutiques, artisan bakers and yet more cafés. Intrigued by a quirky little music shop, Folk å Rock. We went inside and I just got lost in the mountains of vinyl they stocked. Whilst Tom found his happy place, sipping a hot latte in the coffeeshop, downstairs.

 

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As I spent the rest of the afternoon shopping until the sun went down I sadly didn’t get to see one of Malmö’s most famous sights (and as an architecture fan, I’m kicking myself!). Over on Lilla Varvsgatan is the Turning Torso by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. It is the tallest building of the Nordic countries at 190m. The building (as I briefly saw when I got off the train, and since on Google)  literally twists, its sleek silhouette looking majestic in the sky. Thankfully, I will be able to actually see the building when we return (in February).

It was at this point when Tom’s school friend, Gareth came to meet us. He is one half, along with his wife, of the Swedish/Welsh design duo EmeryBloom. After checking a few more vintage records we all went out to the now chilly, dark streets. After introductions we popped in an out of the design stores in The Old Town we met up with Gareth’s wife, the beautiful and talented photographer Mysan Hedblom. Deciding where to escape from the night chill, we initially thought of a new Mexican restaurant. When we found out they were full, it was off back to theirs, with a stop on the way to a pizza joint, of course 😉

Well, myself and Tom weren’t. Pizza in this place was 200 SEK- £20 :/ So on Gareth’s recommendation we went to the Falafel house round the corner. For a tenner each we picked up a huge Lebanese falafel wrap filled with salad, hummus and pickles, a drink and some baklava. With the smell wafting up from the falafel, I just couldn’t wait to eat it.

We stepped into the lobby of an unassuming 60s office block, complete with marble effect floors and stained wooden panel. From the lift we emerged on the roof –  Yes, their house was on the bloody roof. Along with its neighbours it was an amazing glass box, with sharp angles looking out onto a communal garden space. Basically the stuff I read about in Deezeen. Inside, the walls were filled with their own pieces of art. Great photography by Mysan with graphic design by Gareth. This was the Scandinavian interior I’m trying to recreate back home in a Swansea semi-detached. We got the candles on and wine out and tucked in. The falafel was so good, with the sharp bite coming from the pickles. We finished the evening with the baklava, some tea from Well Tea co and a heap of Ylvis videos on Youtube.

Soon, it was time to get the train back to Denmark. I’m glad that the Mexican restaurant was full, as we had a better evening over theirs.

Tack så mycket both!

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